Docker

Coming soon...

Onion omega

Check out the Onion Omega on Kickstarter

Yesterday, I backed the Onion Omega project on Kickstarter. The Onion Omega is a small Raspberry Pi like device which is about 1/4th the size of the Raspberry Pi. The Onion Omega allows you to prototype and develop hardware using popular tools such as Git, pip and npm while programming in high-level languages such as Python, Node.JS, PHP, Lua and my personal favorite: Ruby (amongst other languages). The Omega has built-in 802.11 b/g/n WiFi, an Atheros AR9331 400MHZ MIPS 24K processor, 64MB of DDR2 RAM, 16MB of flash storage, 18 GPIO ports and runs OpenWRT Linux.

The device comes with a dock (and at the level I backed it at an expansion of my choosing) which exposes commonly used interfaces such as USB, power, an RGB LED, buttons and more. In addition to the standard dock, you can also get an Arduino Shield dock compatible with your existing Arduino shields. Currently there are 4 (?) stackable expansions set to be released: an ethernet...

Indoor plant growing

About a month ago now I was given some of the clippings (spiderettes) off from one of the many Spider Plants my coworker maintains in his office at work. Watching the easy to grow Spider Plant grow and thrive has spurred my dormant interest in plants and over the past weekend I started buying some supplies. I bought two new Ponytail Palm and am (hopefully) in the process of cloning my grandmother's Christmas Cactus. I added a Majesty Palm into the mix and a Snake Plant for the upstairs. One thing I have always wanted was a bonsai tree. I picked up a cheap Ginseng Ficus from Meijer but it doesn't seem very authentic. On the other hand, I ordered an 8 year old Chinese Elm Bonsai Tree from Bonsai Outlet which I am really excited to receive. Finallly, I grabbed some other miscellaneous folliage and some bamboo shoots to put in a vase. I might have gotten a bit obsessed.

Growing the Spider Plant from the spiderettes has proven to be one of the simplest plant growing experiences I have...

Sparta hack

I had the pleasure of volunteering for Michigan State University (MSU)'s 1st Ever Official Hackathon: SpartaHack 2015 - #LiveByTheCode this weekend. I arrived about an hour after registrations began Friday evening. It was a bit hectic at first as copious amounts of snacks and drinks were being delivered just as volunteers were arriving and getting situated with official volunteer t-shirts/badges and hackers were arriving to register for the hack. As hectic as it may have been the directors were able to quickly pull together all of the volunteers and orchestrate an awesome beginning to the first ever SpartaHack at MSU, filled with swag, food, snacks, drinks, RedBull, API/tech talks, corporate sponsors and an MSU Sweet Sixteen victory (62-58) over the Oklahoma Sooners. Some of the swag included in the drawstring bag that registrants were given included an awesome SpartaHack t-shirt, $5 in bitcoins from Circle, a $5 Starbucks gift...

Railsbricks3

RailsBricks3 claims to enable faster Rails application creation by "automating mundane setup tasks and configuring useful common gems for you." RailsBricks will work on any computer running Linux or OS X (it will work on Windows as well with a bit of effort) with Ruby. Simply install the RailsBricks gem with gem install railsbricks and run rbricks -n. Issuing this command will start you on what feels like a somewhat tedious task of answering questions about your desired application. Although tedious when you start considering the time you are saving with each question it all starts to come together.

RailsBricks3 walks you through authentication with the popular Devise if desired. Automically adds Bootstrap 3 and FontAwesome with a simple yes or no. Walks you through setting up your email configuration (SMTP server, port, credentials, etc.), keeps your secrets with Figaro, has database tools with rbricks -r and installs many popular gems. RailsBricks3 will...


Copyright © 2015 by Justin Vrooman